MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE
MAKING SAFE SEX SIMPLE

Can stress cause bacterial vaginosis?

Can stress cause bacterial vaginosis?

When the balance of bacteria in the vagina is upset, it can lead to the common illness known as bacterial vaginosis (BV). It exhibits signs including discharge, irritation, and a disagreeable odor. Despite the fact that the precise origin of BV is not yet fully understood, it is known that a number of factors can raise the risk of the condition. Stress is one of these components.

1. Immune system and stress: The immune system is one of the many things that stress can do to the body. Protecting the body against disease and infection is the job of the immune system. When we are under stress, the immune system might not work as well, which could make us more prone to illness and infections. 2. Hormonal changes and stress Hormonal changes brought on by stress can also impact the vaginal bacterial ecosystem. The delicate balance of microorganisms in the vagina, for instance, might be upset when stress increases the hormone cortisol.

3. Stress and hygiene: Stress has a negative impact on hygiene practices, which raises the risk of BV. For instance, you could skip showers or neglect to wash your hands more frequently if you're under stress. The risk of BV may rise as a result of an accumulation of bacteria and other germs in the vaginal region.

4. Douches and additional elements: Stress may also raise the chance of BV by making it more likely that other risk factors, such as using scented products, using douches, or having many partners, would also occur.

It's important to keep in mind that stress does not directly cause BV, but it can affect how symptoms appear. If you are displaying symptoms of BV, it is imperative to speak with a healthcare provider for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Controlling stress, upholding basic cleanliness, and participating in safe sex are also essential to halting the growth of BV. At Juna, we gently and with clinical support treat BV. Click this link to read more about our treatment strategy.


References:

  1. "Bacterial Vaginosis - Diagnosis and Treatment." Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 18 Nov. 2020, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bacterial-vaginosis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20352288.
  2. "Bacterial Vaginosis." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 20 Mar. 2018, www.cdc.gov/std/bv/stdfact-bacterial-vaginosis.htm.
  3. "The Relationship Between Stress and Illness." American Psychological Association, American Psychological Association, www.apa.org/topics/relationship-between-stress-illness/.
  4. "The Effects of Stress on Your Body." Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 3 Mar. 2020, www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/stress/art-20046037.
  5. "Bacterial Vaginosis." World Health Organization, World Health Organization, www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/rtis/bacterial-vaginosis/en/.

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